Brand|SHIBUYA CITY GAMES

Open
Content Menu
  • Twitter icon
  • Facebook icon
  • Linkedin icon
  • GooglePlus icon
  • Pinterest icon

The world speed record is 9.58 seconds,
and it has stood for 8 years.
Is this the final limit for human speed?

There are other athletes rapidly closing
in on the world's fastest times.

They are just one second away from the world record.

When will the "limit of human achievement" be exceeded?

It might not happen for many years.
It might happen tomorrow.

The Ever-expanding Possibilities of
Robotics for the Future of Humanity

HUMAN meets ROBOTICS

Ken Endo, Researcher of Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc.

Lower-limb prosthesis enables people who could not walk to walk again.
But is this technology of use only to those with disabilities?

Restoring sight to those who could not see was once an intractable challenge.
But thanks to the evolution of technology,
even 100 year old people can now see clearly.

A future in which everyone can walk, run, and move.
A world without physical troubles.

Our aim is to make this future a reality,
expanding human possibility through the power of robotics.
Our challenge is to expand the future potential of humanity.

Technology has the power to open new possibilities for people.

About Project

"Robotic lower-limb prosthesis" will bring the delight of locomotion to all people.

Robotic lower-limb prosthesis

Motors are installed in the ankles and knees, to reproduce the movement of human legs. Bringing the delight of locomotion to all people.

Robotic lower-limb prosthesis image

MORE

OPEN button

Not only the technology of "robotic lower-limb prosthesis" eliminates disabilities, but they may be a way of expanding the capabilities of humanity itself.
"Robotic lower-limb prosthesis" incorporate motors in the ankles and knees, reproducing the motion of human legs. When the user begins walking, sensors detect the degree and angle of force impressed on the legs, and the robot artificially recreates the motions of kicking off the ground, stretching the legs, returning to the original position and so on. When the user kicks off the ground, the kick provides motive power, making walking easier than with conventional lower-limb prothesis. With these "robotic lower-limb prosthesis", everyone can experience the delight of locomotion in their everyday lives, regardless of age or ability.

CLOSE

CLOSE button
Bringing the joy of walking again to as many people as possible. "Lower-limb prosthesis for developing countries".

Lower-limb prosthesis for developing countries

In order to provide lower-limb prosthesis to people in the developing world, where the vast majority of people with lower-limb disabilities reside, we are aiming to produce lower-limb prosthesis that can be offered at a cost of about 3,000 yen each.

Lower-limb prosthesis for developing countries image

MORE

OPEN button

Lower-limb prosthesis for developing countries are developed with a cost target of about 3,000 yen per unit. A key feature of this R&D project is that it is going forward based on a business model of production in local factories using plastics or resins that can be sourced locally. Production in developing countries is different from that in developed countries in every conceivable way, including technology, materials, personnel and environment. Yet the aim to produce the best possible result with the environmental and other factors given is the same among making a leading-edge robotic lower-limb prosthesis and with making a 3,000 yen lower-limb prosthesis. This relentless pursuit of low cost offers benefits for Japanese users:  under Japan's national health-insurance system, coverage for lower-limb prosthesis is for one leg only. Low-priced lower-limb prosthesis have the potential to benefit users not only in the developing world but in Japan as well, in a wide range of activities and modes of living.

CLOSE

CLOSE button
Superseding people's limitations to post new world records for the short-distance sprint: "running-specific prosthesis for athletes".

Running-specific prosthesis for athletes

Challenge to set the world's fastest record with athletes wearing "Xiborg Genesis", a running-specific prosthesis for athletes.

Running-specific prosthesis for athletes image

MORE

OPEN button

In 2017, athletes with lower-limb prosthesis came to a stage in which they are able to compete on the world stage side-by-side with able-bodied athletes. "Xiborg Genesis" is a lower-limb prosthesis for athletes which was created by gathering the knowledeges of a wide range of experts, including athletes, engineers, coaches and prosthetists. These lower-limb prosthesis are fashioned using carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP). The rigidity of the plate springs is determined by a multitude of factors including shape, type of fiber used, and the thickness. The engineers have accumulated a vast store of expertise fabricating plate springs that satisfy rigidity optimized to the gait and body shape of each athlete. The challenge of enabling the disabled people without legs "to set new records" for all humanity continues.

CLOSE

CLOSE button

Researcher

Developer of lower-limb prosthesis

Ken Endo profile image
Ken Endo Image

Expanding humanity's possibilities for the future through technology.

After graduating from Keio University with a master's degree, Ken Endo traveled to the United States. There he joined the Biomechatronics group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, where he worked on the analysis human physical capabilities and the development of lower-limb prosthesis. Currently he is pursuing research on expanding human physical capabilities using robot technology, as a researcher at Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc.

Ken Endo Researcher of Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc.
Xiborg Inc., CEO

PROFILE

Event Report

[ The Challenge for 60m World's Fastest ]

On November 5th 2017, Shibuya's public street became a race track.

Participants in the "Shibuya City Games ~The Challenge for the World's Fastest~" attempted to set a new world record with the track created on Fire Street of Shibuya. Three world-class athletes with lower-limb prosthesiscame to Japan for the event: Jarryd Wallace, wearing the "Xiborg Genesis", a running-specific prosthesis for athletes developed based on the research of Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc.(Sony CSL), Richard Browne, the current 100 meter world record holder, and Felix Streng. The race was held on a running track set up in front of Shibuya MODI, in attempt to beat the 60 meter world record.

Richard Browne came in first place, finishing with the time of 7.14 seconds, just 0.75 seconds away from the world record time of 6.39 seconds! There was tremendous excitement in the air when the spectators saw this result. For the second half of the event, 45 general participants ranging from elementary school to college students took part in the challenge run, racing on the publicstreets of Shibuya where running is normally impossible.

On the stage, the guests were Ken Endo, researcher of Sony CSL and CEO of Xiborg Inc., Dai Tamesue, a former track and field athlete and running officer of Xiborg Inc., and So Takei, a former Japanese track and field national champion in the decathlon. Along with the spectators, they cheered loudly for the athletes as they all ran their hearts out.

report picture 01
report picture 02
report picture 03
report picture 04
report picture 05
report picture 06
report picture 07

Sponsor: Shibuya Art Festival Executive Committee, Tartan track supported by Osaka Gas Co., Ltd.

Shibuya City Games Official Trailer
[ THE DAY ]

On November 5th 2017, Shibuya's public street became a race track.

Participants in the "Shibuya City Games ~The Challenge for the World's Fastest~" attempted to set a new world record with the track created on Fire Street of Shibuya.Three world-class athletes with lower-limb prosthesiscame to Japan for the event: Jarryd Wallace, wearing the "Xiborg Genesis", a running-specific prosthesis for athletes developed based on the research of Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc.(Sony CSL), Richard Browne, the current 100 meter world record holder, and Felix Streng. The race was held on a running track set up in front of Shibuya MODI, in attempt to beat the 60 meter world record.

Richard Browne came in first place, finishing with the time of 7.14 seconds, just 0.75 seconds away from the world record time of 6.39 seconds! There was tremendous excitement in the air when the spectators saw this result. For the second half of the event, 45 general participants ranging from elementary school to college students took part in the challenge run, racing on the publicstreets of Shibuya where running is normally impossible.

On the stage, the guests were Ken Endo, researcher of Sony CSL and CEO of Xiborg Inc., Dai Tamesue, a former track and field athlete and running officer of Xiborg Inc., and So Takei, a former Japanese track and field national champion in the decathlon. Along with the spectators, they cheered loudly for the athletes as they all ran their hearts out.

report picture 01
report picture 02
report picture 03
report picture 04
report picture 05
report picture 06
report picture 07

Sponsor: Shibuya Art Festival Executive Committee, Tartan track supported by Osaka Gas Co., Ltd.

Shibuya City Games Official Trailer
[ THE DAY ]

Share this page

  • Twitter icon
  • Facebook icon
  • Linkedin icon
  • GooglePlus icon
  • Pinterest icon