Updated on August 29, 2018

Reduction and Replacement of Chemical Substances of Very High Concern

Sony defines "Environment-related Substances to be Controlled" (hereafter "Controlled Substances") as certain chemicals that it has determined to have significant impact on both humans and the global environment, including substances that may not be controlled by laws. (Please refer to the list "Controlled Substances' Defined by Sony.") Sony either prohibits the use of these substances in parts or phases them out wherever a viable alternative that meets all product quality and technical requirements is available. In its Green Management 2020 mid-term management targets, Sony specifies high-risk applications from collected application- and content-related information, considering the hazardous nature and extent of exposure (volume) as risk factors, and plans to prohibit the "Controlled Substances" in the specified use.

"Controlled Substances" Defined by Sony
  • Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)
  • Dibutyl phthalate (DBP)
  • Benzyl butyl phthalate(BBP)
  • Diisobutyl phthalate(DIBP)
  • Cadmium and cadmium compounds
  • Lead and lead compounds
  • Mercury and mercury compounds
  • Chromium(Ⅳ) compounds
  • Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs)
  • Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs)
  • Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) and all major diastereoisomers identified
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and specific substitutes
  • Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs)
  • Polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs)
  • Alkanes, C10-13, chloro (Short Chain Chlorinated Paraffins) (SCCP)
  • Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP)
  • Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TCPP)
  • Tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)
  • Fluorinated greenhouse gases (PFC, SF6, HFC)
  • Ozone depleting substances (ODS) (CFC, Halon, Carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-Trichloroethane)
  • Ozone depleting substances (ODS) (HCFCs)
  • Perfluorooctane sulfonates (PFOS)
  • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and individual salts and esters of PFOA
  • Tri-substituted organostannic compounds
  • Dibutyltin (DBT) compounds
  • Dioctyltin (DOT) compounds
  • Beryllium oxide
  • Cobalt dichloride
  • Diarsenic trioxide
  • Diarsenic pentoxide
  • Nickel
  • Diisononyl phthalate (DINP)
  • Di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP)
  • Di-n-Octyl phthalate (DNOP)
  • Asbestos
  • Formaldehyde
  • Azocolourants and azodyes which form certain aromatic amines
  • Benzenamine, N-phenyl-, reaction products with styrene and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene (BNST)
  • 2-benzotriazol-2-yl-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol (UV-320)
  • Dimethyl fumarate (DMF)
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)
  • Brominated flame retardants (BFR)
  • Chlorinated flame retardants(CFR)
  • Di-n-hexyl phthalate (DnHP)
  • Perchlorates
  • Radioactive substances
  • Substances in candidate list for authorization of EU REACH regulation
  • Polyvinyl chlorides (PVCs) and PVC compounds
  • Note:
    -Control level varies depending on application.

Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

Improper disposal of PVCs poses a risk of generating hazardous substances. For example, Sony is concerned about the possibility that its small electronic products, in particular, could be collected to obtain valuable materials, and then the unwanted parts could be improperly incinerated and disposed of in landfills, thus causing adverse environmental impacts. In addition, there are also concerns about the environmental and health impact of some of the substances used as plasticizers and stabilizers in PVCs. Although PVCs are not currently regulated by any laws that apply to chemical substances used in electronic products, Sony works to reduce PVC content in individual components.

As a result, Sony does not use PVCs in product packaging materials (with the exception of some packing materials for devices, semiconductors, batteries, and similar items) or in sheets/laminates used for product housings, contactless IC cards, and carrying bags/cases for products (excluding those for professional use). Sony has also successfully replaced PVCs by substitute materials for internal components that are difficult to remove prior to recycling, such as flexible flat cables, insulation plates, and heat-shrink tubes (excluding those for batteries). Also, Sony is working to end the use of PVCs in the housings and internal wiring of small electronic devices (the adoption of alternatives is subject to the ability to resolve issues relating to quality, technology, and supply).

As of the end of July 2018, Sony has replaced PVCs in new products and new models in the following products with alternative substances.

PVC-Free Product Categories*1
Xperia™ Smartphone
Xperia™ Tablet
MP3 players WALKMAN®
IC recorder/ Portable Radio Recorder
Video Camera Handycam®
Video Camera Action Cam
Digital Still Camera Cyber-shot™
Interchangeable lens digital camera α™
PlayStation®Vita
Portable DVD Player
Portable Blu-ray Disc™/DVD Player
Memory Stick™
SxS™ memory card
  • *1PVCs have been eliminated from all plastic components in Xperia™ smartphones and tablets, and from the casings and internal wiring (excluding accessories) in products other than Xperia™ smartphones and tablets.

Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs)

Some BFRs are harmful to human health and tend to remain in the environment and accumulate in living organisms. As is the case with PVC, improper incineration of BFRs carries a risk of releasing harmful substances into the environment.

Sony has banned the use of components and materials containing any of three specified BFRs — polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polybrominated biphenyls, or hexabromocyclododecanes — and is working to phase out BFRs (the adoption of which is subject to the resolution of issues relating to quality, technology, and supply). Sony has also developed an environmentally sound, bromine-free flame retardant for the manufacture of a polycarbonate plastic flame retardant that is used in such products as the LCD TV Bravia™ XBR-65X900F flat-screen TV and the Cyber-Shot™ DSC-HX400V digital camera.

As of the end of July 2018, Sony has replaced BFRs in new products and new models in the following products with alternative substances.

BFR-Free Product Categories*1
Xperia™ Smartphone
Xperia™ Tablet
MP3 players WALKMAN®
IC recorder / Memory Card Recorder / Portable Radio Recorder / Linear PCM Recorder
Video Camera Handycam®
Video Camera Action Cam
Digital Still Camera Cyber-shot™
Interchangeable lens digital camera α™
PlayStation®Vita
Portable DVD Player
Portable Blu-ray Disc™/DVD Player
Memory Stick™
SxS™ memory card
  • *1BFRs have been eliminated from all plastic components in Xperia™ smartphones and tablets, and from the casings and main PWBs (excluding accessories) in products other than Xperia™ smartphones and tablets.

Sony has banned the use of tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate, a chlorinated flame retardant identified as carrying risks similar to those associated with brominated flame retardants, as well as phosphoric acid tris (2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ester (TCPP) and tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP).

Phthalates

Sony is working to eliminate specific phthalates (phthalic esters), which are used as plasticizers in PVC, among other substances. Among these specific phthalates, for example, Sony has succeeded in eliminating the phthalates DEHP, DBP, BBP, DIDP, DNOP and DINP*1 from Xperia™ smartphones.

  • *1DEHP stands for bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate; DBPs for dibutyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate; BBPs for benzyl butyl phthalate and butyl benzyl phthalate; DIDP for di-isodecyl phthalate; DNOP for di-n-octyl phthalate; and DINP for di-isononyl phthalate.

Beryllium Compounds

Sony has designated beryllium oxide as "Controlled Substances" since 2007 and is working to eliminate these substances. No beryllium oxide is used in any of its products. Sony has also succeeded in eliminating beryllium compounds from Xperia™ smartphones.

Arsenic Compounds

In accordance with the 13th edition of the SS-00259, released in 2014, Sony has banned the use of LCD panels containing diarsenic trioxide and diarsenic pentoxide.

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