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Sony Science Program
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  • “How Power Generation and Storage Works”
Imagination is the greatest gift we could have, for anything we can imagine, we can make real. That is the spirit of Sony, and a spirit which we seen an abundance of in Sony Creative Science Awards. Held by the Sony Group of Companies in Singapore and Science Centre Singapore, the Sony Creative Science Awards (SCSA) provides an important avenue for young students to showcase their imagination and innovative streak.
Into its 16th year, a total of 4220 toys were submitted by 6330 students from 96 primary schools, further cementing SCSA's popularity and recognition as Singapore's longest running toy competition.

SCSA winners and students were also given the opportunity to experience the wonders of science through the Sony Science Program (SSP) workshop, where they were taught by Sony volunteers how to construct their very own pair of headphones or battery. The satisfaction of learning was clearly shown on their faces when they realized that they had created a fully working product by themselves.

Headphones Workshop

Almost everyone of us would own a pair of headphones, but not many of us can claim to own a pair of headphones that have been constructed by ourselves. With the SSP headphone workshop, students were taught how to construct their own pair of headphones using recyclable materials, and learned how sound is created in the headphones. Many students were amazed at how simple materials such as plastic bottles and cardboard can be used with copper wires and magnets to create a pair of working headphones.

Battery Workshop

Modern day civilizations rely on electronic devices, which in turn rely on batteries. Such is the importance of batteries, and this was shared with students through the hands-on experience of the SSP battery workshop. Students were taught on how a battery works, and on the fundamentals of energy and electric current. Completed batteries were then used by the students to power up a mini music box, which is in itself a demonstration of a complete energy and electric circuit.

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