Donation Report

Original ball"Join the Team!"produced by Sony

♦We distributed 3,372 balls to children around Africa.
Where the balls went.
Breakdown by country

Thanks to the generosity of our customers and the hard work of Sony Group companies, we donated a total of 3,372 balls in 15 African countries.
Local NGOs and international agencies like the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) actually presented the balls to the children.
Here are photos and comments from some of the schools and communities that received Sony original balls.

An orphanage in the Brong-Ahafo
Region. The kids here adore soccer so
they were thrilled with their new ball.
(Ghana)
The soccer superstars of the future?
(Ghana)
A new soccer ball is a dream come true
for these kids, as their smiling faces
attest. (Ghana)
After their ball broke, this team hadn't
been able to play for three months. The
new ball solved that problem. (Ghana)
So much excitement accompanied a
friendly match featuring the new ball that
most of the village turned out in support.
(Ghana)
One happy P.E. teacher: "Now I can play
football with the kids." (Kenya)
The football club is the most popular club
in the school. Enrollment went up with the
arrival of the new balls. (Kenya)
Balls were presented to the schools
which came top in the practical health
and hygiene competition. (Benin)
School staff believe that the ball will
enable to them to provide even better
lessons for the children in their charge.
(Botswana)
A football team at the refugee hosting
community in Kakuma receives new balls.
(Kenya)

The schoolyard suddenly burst into life

Moi High School, Biruli, Kenya

Naomi Nishinomiya
Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteer
Village Development Officer, NGO Nyariga Craft Society

Our school used to have only one worn-out old soccer ball, despite there being 600 pupils here. The kids had to wait their turn for a go, or else they'd improvise a ball by rolling up scraps of cloth and bits of string. Trouble was, the stronger kids tended up to get all the ball time, while most of the other children never got near it.
We were lucky enough to be given ten balls. With the increase in number, the school grounds suddenly burst into life. Kids who'd never got a chance to touch the ball before and others who didn't normally venture outside-they all started playing soccer. I was astonished at the level of pent-up demand. Now more of the pupils can play serious, focused soccer for a decent length of time.

With more balls, more pupils got the
chance to play than before.
Kids were playing soccer all over the
school grounds. That was something
completely new.

Thrilled with a gift from a country faraway

Nyariga Youth Soccer Team, Ghana

Naomi Nishinomiya
Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteer
Village Development Officer, NGO Nyariga Craft Society

Nyariga is a village of about 3,000 people. The kids here all love soccer. Crowds formed in front of the small TVs in the houses with electricity to watch the games. I presented six balls to the local youth team. As part of the simple donation ceremony, I explained what sort of company Sony was and got the kids to find Japan and Ghana on an inflatable globe. They were deeply impressed. "These balls have come from a really faraway country," they said.
Previously they had used a very decrepit ball, so were amazed at how different the new balls felt from the very first kick. "Before we only had a single ball," explained the happy coach. "That meant we couldn't do focused, position-based practice. But now the goalkeepers can do their training while everyone else does passing practice."
Asked how he felt about the new balls, eleven-year-old Akolga said, "I fell like I've got a bit more skillful just because of the new ball. I'm young and up until now I hardly got the chance to get a touch. Now I want to practice with this new ball, so I can improve."

The children all put on their very best
football kit for the presentation
ceremony.
A gleaming new soccer ball. What better
present could there be?
No line markings and a couple of sticks in
the ground for goalposts, but everyone's
focused and enjoying the game.

The kids are smiling a whole lot more

Kabronga Primary and Junior High School, Lusaka, Zambia

Yoshiaki Ishida
Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteer
PE teacher

The kids were thrilled when they saw the new balls. In fact, they were so keen to get their hands on them I was worried a fight might break out! Some kids were saying, "I know Sony!", and others, "I love the design of the ball."
I'm a Japan Overseas Cooperation Volunteer and teach physical education. There weren't enough balls for the number of pupils in the school I'm at, so teaching efficient lessons was a big challenge. Now we're using the balls that were donated to the school not just for soccer in my classes, but for dodgeball and volleyball too. They're also being used for club activities and matches after school hours. It doesn't just mean the kids have more of an opportunity to play ball games-I think they're smiling a while lot more now too.

The balls donated to the school are being
used not just for regular lessons, but for
club activities and matches too.
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