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Environment

Reduction and Replacement of Chemical Substances of Very High Concern

"Controlled Substances" Defined by Sony
Cadmium and cadmium compounds Lead and lead compounds
Mercury and mercury compounds Hexavalent chromium compounds
Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE) (including decabromodiphenyl ether [DecaBDE])
Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) Other brominated organic compounds
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCN)
Polychlorinated terphenyls (PCT) Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCP)
Tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP),
Tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate (TCPP),
Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)
Perchlorates
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and PVC blends Other chlorinated organic compounds
Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC), Perfluorocarbon (PFC), Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) Ozone depleting substances (ODS)
Perfluorooctane sulfonates (PFOS) Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and individual salts and esters of PFOA
Trisubstituted organotin compounds
(including tributyltin (TBT) compounds and triphenyltin (TPT) compounds)
Dibutyltin (DBT) compounds
Dioctyltin (DOT) compounds Beryllium oxide
Beryllium copper Cobalt dichloride
Diarsenic trioxide, Diarsenic pentaoxide Bis (2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, Dibutyl phthalate, Benzyl butyl phthalate, Diisobutyl phthalate
Di-isononyl phthalate, Di-isodecyl phthalate, Di-n-octyl phthalate, Di-n-hexyl phthalate,
"1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C6-8-branched alkyl esters, C7-rich",
"1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, di-C7-11-branched and linear alkyl esters",
Bis(2-methoxyethyl) phthalate, Diisopentylphthalate,
"1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, dipentylester, branched and linear",
N-pentyl-isopentylphthalate,
Dipentyl phthalate
Asbestos Specific azo compounds
Formaldehyde Specific benzotriazole
Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)
Boric acid, specific sodium borates 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl) phenol
Bis(2-methoxyethyl) ether N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC)
Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (EGDME) Trixylyl phosphate (TXP)

Note:
Control level varies depending on application.


Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

(Updated on August 22, 2014)

Although PVC is not currently regulated by any laws that apply to chemical substances used in electronics products, Sony continues to promote the use of alternatives. As a result, Sony does not use PVC in product packaging materials, casings, sheets/laminates of speaker housings, contactless IC cards and carrying bags/cases for products (excluding those for professional use). Sony has also been successful in replacing PVC by a developed alternative in several internal components such as flexible flat cables, insulation plates and electrical heat shrink tubes (excluding those for batteries), all of which are difficult to remove prior to recycling. Sony is concerned with the possibility that, in particular, its small electronics products could be collected for obtaining valuable materials, and then the unwanted parts could be improperly incinerated and disposed of in landfills. Considering the impact of these activities on the environment, Sony is promoting the replacement of PVC with alternative substances (for products where quality, technological and supply problems have been resolved).

As of the end of July 2014, for the following products Sony replaced PVC with alternative substances in new products and new models. In addition to information on product categories provided below, follow the link for "Examples of PVC-free Products and BFR-free Products."
PVC-Free and BFR-Free Product Categories*
Xperia™ Smartphone
Xperia™ Tablet
MP3 players WALKMAN®
IC recorder/Memory Card Recorder/Portable Radio Recorder/Linear PCM Recorder
Video Camera Handycam®
Video Camera Action Cam
Digital Still Camera Cyber-shot™
Digital Photo Frame S-Frame™
Interchangeable lens digital camera α™
PSP®(PlayStation®Portable)
PlayStation®Vita
Digital Book Reader Reader™
Portable DVD Player
Portable Blu-ray Disc™/DVD Player

*
Parts in which PVC is eliminated are as below (excluding accessories):
Xperia™ Smartphones: in all plastic components
Products other than Xperia™ Smartphones: in casings and internal wiring


Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs)

(Updated on August 22, 2014)


  • BFR alternatives have been used in the main PWB of Xperia™ Z2

Some BFRs are harmful to human health and tend to remain in the environment and accumulate in living organisms.

As is the case with PVC, improper incineration of BFRs carries a risk of releasing harmful substances into the environment. Sony replaced BFRs with alternative substances in new products and new models (for products where quality, technological and supply problems have been resolved). As of July 2014, Sony had replaced BFRs with alternative substances in all new products and new models of the products listed below. For more information, refer to the table titled "Examples of PVC-Free and BFR-Free Products."

PVC-Free and BFR-Free Product Categories*
Xperia™ Smartphone
Xperia™ Tablet
MP3 players WALKMAN®
IC recorder/Memory Card Recorder/Portable Radio Recorder/Linear PCM Recorder
Video Camera Handycam®
Video Camera Action Cam
Digital Still Camera Cyber-shot™
Digital Photo Frame S-Frame™
Interchangeable lens digital camera α™
PSP®(PlayStation®Portable)
PlayStation®Vita
Digital Book Reader Reader™
Portable DVD Player
Portable Blu-ray Disc™/DVD Player
In accordance with the 13th edition of the SS-00259, released in 2014, Sony has banned the use of components and materials containing hexabromocyclododecane in its products. This is in addition to a ban on components and materials containing polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polybrominated biphenyls. Sony has also banned the use of tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate, a chlorinated flame retardant identified as carrying risks similar to those associated with brominated flame retardants, as well as phosphoric acid tris (2-chloro-1-methylethyl) ester (TCPP) and tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP).

Sony has also developed an environmentally conscious flame retardant that contains no bromine, to be used for polycarbonate plastic with high flame-retardant and thermal-resistant properties. This flame retardant is used, for example, in casings and components for interchangeable lens digital cameras, including α™58, and in internal parts of digital still cameras Cyber-shot™.

*
Parts in which BFRs are eliminated are as below (excluding accessories):
Xperia™ Smartphones: in PWBs, casings and cables.
Products other than Xperia™ Smartphones: in casings and main PWBs.


Mercury

(Updated on August 22, 2014)


  • Mercury-free alkaline button battery

Conventionally, button batteries require a minute amount of mercury to suppress the generation of hydrogen gas inside the battery. Eliminating the use of mercury in button batteries had proven very difficult from a technical standpoint. However, Sony was strongly determined to remove the environmental burden presented even by such a tiny amount of mercury. Sony began shipping mercury-free batteries in 2005 and in 2009 succeeded in developing a mercury-free alkaline button battery. One result of these and other efforts to reduce its use of mercury was the termination of the production of Sony-branded silver oxide batteries in 2013.

Phthalates

(Updated on August 22, 2014)

Sony is working to eliminate specific phthalates (phthalic esters), which are used as plasticizers in PVC, among other substances. Among these specific phthalates, for example, Sony has succeeded in eliminating phthalates (DEHP, DBP, BBP, DIDP, DNOP and DINP)* from Xperia™ Smartphones. Sony has also eliminated the use of phthalates in the bodies of PSP®(PlayStation®Portable) units and in the AC adapters packaged with those units shipped to Europe.

*
DEHP: Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate; DBP: Dibutyl phthalate, Di-n-butyl phthalate; BBP: Benzyl butyl phthalate, Butyl benzyl phthalate; DIDP: Di-isodecyl phthalate; DNOP: Di-n-octyl phthalate; DINP: Di-isononyl phthalate.


Beryllium Compounds

(Updated on August 22, 2014)

Sony has designated beryllium oxide and beryllium copper as "Controlled Substances" since 2007 and is working to eliminate these substances. No beryllium oxide is used in any of its products. Sony has also succeeded in eliminating beryllium compounds from Xperia™ Smartphones.

Arsenic Compounds

(Updated on August 22, 2014)

In accordance with the 13th edition of the SS-00259, released in 2014, Sony has banned the use of LCD panels containing diarsenic trioxide and diarsenic pentoxide.



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