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October 18, 2010

SONY AND CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL TO BRING NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN 3D WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY TO BIODIVERSITY CONVENTION

Joining Forces to Explore Ways for 3D Imagery to Help Achieve Conservation


Sony Corporation (Sony) and Conservation International (CI) have teamed up to bring compelling wildlife photography in 3D to over 14,000 delegates at the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (COP10) taking place over the next two weeks in Nagoya, Japan. The 3D images can be viewed at the "Sony 3D Kiosk" in the CI booth located at the Nagoya Congress Center.

Since 1995, CI and Sony have worked together to make global biodiversity accessible to audiences worldwide. This year, in addition to digital cameras, camcorders and editing equipment, Sony provided CI with NEX-5 interchangeable lens digital cameras with 3D capabilities to enable CI photographers to capture some of the first-ever 3D images. "We are proud that Sony's cutting-edge imaging technology is playing a meaningful role in CI's work surrounding the conservation of biodiversity by delivering rare photos and video footage of this beautiful planet to people all over the world," said Hidemi Tomita, General Manager of Corporate Social Responsibility, Sony Corporation. "We are confident that Sony, and particularly our 3D technology, will further contribute to the field of biodiversity conservation."

"We are thrilled to have Sony bring Conservation International's wildlife photography to life with their amazing 3D technology," said Yasushi Hibi, Vice President for Asia Policy for Conservation International Japan. "This new technology serves both as a tool for scientific documentation and as a means of raising awareness amongst viewers by vividly portraying the natural environment Conservation International aims to protect."

Using Sony's 3D technology, CI's President Dr. Russ Mittermeier and photographer John Martin traveled to Suriname's Central Nature Reserve - a protected area of the country that has rarely, if ever, been visited by humans in modern times. While there, Martin was able to photograph dense rainforests, often difficult to portray with traditional photography, in 3D significantly improving the image viewing experience. Because the forests of Suriname play an important role in mitigating the effects of global climate change, CI and Sony hope that bringing these 3D images to the conference will inspire attendees to support the conservation of biodiversity all over the world.

Sony's 3D technology was also used to capture still images of Brazil's biologically diverse area of Pantanal. The Pantanal is the world's largest wetland and has the highest concentration of fauna in the Americas. CI sent Brazilian photographer Luciano Candisani, who has a long history of working in the open plains of the Pantanal, to experiment with how 3D could portray life in the region with a fresh perspective. As COP10 attendees will see, the results are captivating. Sony and CI will continue to explore how 3D photography and video can help achieve conservation results.


About Sony Corporation

Sony Corporation is a leading manufacturer of audio, video, game, communications, key device and information technology products for the consumer and professional markets. With its music, pictures, computer entertainment and on-line businesses, Sony is uniquely positioned to be the leading electronics and entertainment company in the world. Sony recorded consolidated annual sales of approximately $78 billion for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010. Sony Global Web Site: http://www.sony.net/

For more information on Sony Group's CSR related activities, please visit http://www.sony.net/SonyInfo/csr/

About Conservation International (CI)

Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, CI empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature, our global biodiversity, for the well-being of humanity. With headquarters in Washington, DC, CI works in more than 40 countries on four continents.

For more information please visit www.conservation.org

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