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Robot

1999

  • ERS-110
    ERS-110

    First-generation model of the “AIBO” four-legged autonomous entertainment robot. Not only capable of a range of performances, the robot could also “learn” and express emotions.

2000

  • SDR-3X
    SDR-3X
    (prototype)

    Compact robot (height 50cm) capable of bipedal motion. Incorporated a total of 24 joints within its body, enabling it to carry out not only basic movements but to also balance on one foot and even kick a ball. Attracted attention as the “para para” dancing robot.

  • ERS-210
    ERS-210

    Second-generation AIBO, its additional sensors and LEDs enabled it to express an increased range of emotions, such as joy. New speech-recognition and image-capturing functions were also added.

2001

  • ERS-311/ERS-312
    ERS-311
    ERS-312

    This model provided a new look for AIBO with its charming design. When programmed with its dedicated software, the ivory-colored “LATTE.” would take on an “obedient and gentle” personality, while the gray-colored “MACRARON” model would behave in a “playful and mischievous” manner. These characteristics would evolve according to the AIBO’s interactions and environment.

  • ERS-220
    ERS-220

    This model featured a striking new futuristic design. Software could be added to provide an enhanced interactive experience, while images and sound captured via its integrated camera and microphone could be transferred and enjoyed on PCs.

2002

  • SDR-4X
    SDR-4X
    (prototype)

    Incorporating “Real-time Integrated Adaptive Motion Control” activating a total of 38 joints around the robot's body, as well as advanced figuration and sound recognition functions, this model delivered enhanced movement and richer communication. At 58 cm, it was 8 cm taller than the SDR-3X.

  • ERS-31L
    ERS-31L

    A caramel brown AIBO uniquely designed to resemble a pug dog, it delivered the same core functions as the ERS-311/312.

2003

  • QRIO SDR-4XII
    QRIO
    SDR-4XII
    (prototype)

    Designed for use within the home, this compact bipedal robot featured enhanced safety and durability, and increased capacity for communication. It sang original songs written by Ryuichi Sakamoto, and could perform dance demonstrations.

    *QRIO was a prototype, and was not launched commercially.

  • ERS-7
    ERS-7

    Heralded a new stage in the evolution of robot entertainment, with its wide variety of sensors and LEDs realizing advanced image recognition and a range of versatile expressions.

  • QRIO
    QRIO
    (prototype)

    The successful development of integrated walking, jumping, and running movement control technology resulted in the world's first running humanoid robot.

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